UdK Berlin Rundgang 2021

Context Filter


Formerly a pre-dominantly industrial area, the Rummelsburg and the neighbouring Stralauer Halbinsel suffered by the massive deindustrialization of the area after 1990. As many ‘empty’ plots of the area, they became used by very different actors. Such ‘wild’ place were a very typical element of East Berlin from the 90s. As West Berlin was in a good already densified during the years it has been an island, the East was partially truly left behind, space that were suddenly out of the reach of any administration were free to be explored and used. The entire area was once home to squatted clubs, camps of homeless people or Wagenplatz subculture, people living on boots etc. The nineties onwards (1995- first Bebauungsplan) the area has been developed, mostly through residential buildings (This is what we can see on both east and south.) Stralauer Halbinsel (South) had 300 inhabitants in 1997, today it has 4700. Commercial development has also been intensifying during the last years, peeking with the 50.000 m2 office building touching the plot from the south.The plot is now under a highly criticised development, the division of the land, the privatisations, the masterplan, the construction permits and the evictions municipality executed by the municipality were all criticised in the different stages. The masterplan was even contested by a neighbourhood initiative collecting 35.000 signatures (See more: buchtfueralle.noblogs.org) to stop the development plan. An alternative masterplan was also made as part of the protest movement, but has been ignored. In February 2020 the homeless camp with around 100 inhabitants was evicted to make space for an aquarium, a tourist attraction that would host exotic animals, while taking the last natural habitat of many others. Today the Bucht is the last habitat of 6 different kinds of bats and many other wild animals close to the Berliner Ring. The goal of my project is to further explore possibilities of building in the Rummelsburger Bucht. Taking a critical position to both the proceeding and the alternative masterplans, I am interested whether a compromise between the heavy pressure to densify - especially housing - and the radical wish to keep the Bucht as it is, a wild landscape of urban periphery is possible. My own experience from being involved in the protest action against the masterplan and the evictions was a starting point, not in the sense that I aim to propose a comprehensive solution, but in understanding why in the first place all these actors moved to the Bucht, and how a dense development could coexist with that potentiality. The project is rather a study than a finished project, it implies a specific attitude towards city-planning and offers material for further negotiations. I made it for those who (to me) understandably oppose any development in the area. Supervision: Dagmar Pelger, Florian Riegler, Gabriele Schultheiß, Jean-Philippe Vassal

Proposal for the Rummelsburger Bucht

Péter- Kristóf Máthé

For my bachelor project "mittendrin unsichtbar", I spent three months visiting emergency shelters for homeless women in Berlin in the hope of making these women visible. The thought of a homeless person often results in a very stigmatised image: a man with worn-out clothes living on the street. This simplified image of visible homelessness is often linked to social visual conventions and is spread and reinforced by the media, for example with portraits of those affected. Due to such a distortion of perception, many affected persons remain unnoticed: they are women who live inconspicuously in shame of their plight, to keep their homelessness hidden and to protect themselves from violence. Affected women usually seek out emergency overnight shelters to find a safe place to sleep. During the day, they are not offered this protection, as they have to leave the facilities early in the morning. In the city, they are indiscernible as homeless by their visual appearance and thus hardly exist in social perception. They are right in the middle - but invisible. Using disposable cameras, 13 homeless women document their daily lives to cast light upon their living situations and thus become visible, although they remain anonymous on request and are only know by the first letter of their first names. The result is a publication that conceptually and in its design addresses the issue of the invisibility of these women, as well as a website and an Instagram account for digital visibility. Website: www.mittendrin-unsichtbar.de | Code Paul Evans Instagram: @mittendrin_unsichtbar The search for the women involved many visits to various shelters in Berlin. I thank all the leaders for their helpful support in being able to visit the institutions several times. My special thanks go to all the women for participating in the project. I thank them for their openness, their warmth and their trust.

mittendrin unsichtbar – Wohnungslose Frauen in Berlin

Ronja Lang

DELI.DOG - dry dog food from our own kitchen Among all animal-human friendships, the friendship with the dog is the longest and most widespread, as the wolf was the first animal to be domesticated. One reason for this early cohabitation must have been that even the first dogs could be fed with all kinds of food scraps from the human household, not only of animal origin, but also vegetables.In the past 15 years, the number of dogs kept in Germany has increased from 6.5 to 10 million, according to estimates. All these animals also need to be fed. The meat consumption of American cats and dogs alone would be enough to keep the USA in fifth place among the nations with the highest meat consumption in the world. Already today, up to 70 per cent of all global agricultural land is taken up by animal feed production. Conventional meat production is one of the biggest climate polluters. Cattle emit environmentally harmful methane, but the massive use of fertilisers and pesticides, the clearing of rainforest for soya production and the draining of wetlands also contribute to climate change. In addition, one has to imagine that all the food is packed in mini cans up to 20 kg plastic bags and exported worldwide. Which does not improve a dog's CO2 footprint. This is why my approach is to produce the food for the four-legged friend in parallel with our own vegetable-based dishes. In order to still have a positive influence on climate change, we have to eat a vegan diet sooner rather than later. This makes it easier to collect sufficient organic leftovers to process them into dog food. Steaming makes the vegetables soft and more digestible. Afterwards, you should squeeze out the water and drain it to make the food firmer and more durable. If you then heat it to bake it, it can even be kept for days up to a few weeks. In this way, every dog owner can cater to the individual needs of the dog and significantly minimise their own leftovers. In industrially produced dog food, it is often no longer possible to recognise or trace what has been processed, and more and more dogs suffer from allergies where it is no longer possible to draw conclusions about their origin. In contrast, we could also buy our vegetables all produce locally and seasonally, and process them without packaging for us and the dog. This would mean that no meat would have to be produced and the environment would be significantly less polluted. However, a CO2 pawprint cannot be completely avoided. London's parks alone are watered with 4.5 million litres of dog urine every year. But with an awareness of nutrition, many problems can be positively counteracted for humans as well as dogs.

Deli.Dog I Alina Seegert

Design & Social Context, Prof. Ineke Hans, Maciej Chmara

ROOM 117 @ Grunewaldstraße 2-5, UdK Medienhaus // Dating apps are booming. Gone are the days when only baby boomers and elite singles went on the World Wide Web in search of the right sweetheart. Tinder, lovoo, Bumble - the list of online dating services is long. The singles market is booming, especially in big cities. In rural regions, too, people are swiping and discovering the great love in the next village. But what does the whole thing actually look like on islands like Usedom? Even residents of a peninsula are limited by geographical conditions. How long does it take to swipe through the whole island? Do tourists date or only locals and what is the island's dating hotspot where you meet the most lonely souls in summertime? On site, we were told many stories and had perspectives opened up to us. Our Berlin prejudices were refuted and surpassed. Of course, there is no one dating culture on Usedom - just like in other places, it is made up of different people, with their individual stories and needs. People on Usedom are looking for big love just as much as they are looking for small adventures. Lovoo beats Tinder and is also used to make friends. The radius is set larger than the public transport network - so some are actively looking for people beyond Usedom, because with 76,500 and school class sizes of 10 people in some cases, you can definitely swipe through some acquaintances and have to search for the large selection first, at the same time the train tickets are expensive and the trains relatively inflexible. Those who have a car win! And if you don't, you can cycle to the next date - or ask taxi driver Mike. He comes into play at the latest when the local youth has once again spent long nights in the "Hühnerstall", THE club of Usedom. It's not only the tourists who are enchanted by the sight of the sunset on the beach or on the Achterwasser - a typical date for locals, too. If that's too kitschy, you can also go skating on the first date - unless you belong to the handball scene. People from Berlin to Bavaria come to Usedom to celebrate their freshly won love, to find it for a summer, or to escape marriage for a forbidden adventure. Yes, and sometimes the love of a holiday together on Usedom also extends beyond death.

Stadt. Land. Match. - Datingkultur auf Usedom

Irma Hausdorf, Leonie Sophie Anna Fischer, Lea Wessels

Climate change, damage to the biosphere, ocean acidification, deforestation, waste pollution, destruction of biodiversity and much more threaten terrestrial life as we know it. In order to avoid the catastrophe, naturalness and artificiality are often negotiated with each other in our civilised world determined by culture and technology. In doing so, we appear as the artificial, technologised and cultural actors and often view the world around us as passive and primal. But these categories are obsolete. Nature and culture are rather constitutive of each other. Therefore, the question of their points of contact seems more exciting. Where do the border crossings take place? Where do the different structures interact? Where does the becoming together happen? Becoming in alliances? Who is infected with whom and what new assemblages emerge? A Thousand Seeds or the Right to Becoming deals with the infection of the seed with human culture , the catastrophes, the loss of biodiversity. Through his affectation with and fascination with human technological networks, he too became something else, stepping out of his apparent passivity and showing his own agency. By expanding his perception through contact with the drone and the parasitic use of the internet, he begins to control his dispersal. Observing the weather and communicating with each other enables trees and seeds to spread optimally, find the most favourable locations and intervene in selected landscapes to save their own and other species. And does with this agency also come the right to this development and can it be secured in the cultural network of patent law?

A Thousand Seeds or the Right to Becoming

Julius Führer

During the course of the semester we dedicated our time to several graphic design experiments that would fulfill the requirements of the semester topic Stop Making Sense. In a group of five women we explored a lot of collaborative ways to create something together without being able to work physically in one room. In some experiments we passed our contribution one after the other via email or analogue mail to the next person who would continue working on it, reacting to it or drawing on top of it … In other experiments each one of us would receive an individual task that we then worked on at the same time – of course without knowing what the others were doing. At the end all the single results were combined to one collaborative piece. We regularly met on Zoom to talk and brainstorm about new experiments and to do live drawing sessions together. Some of our projects were inspired by childhood games like Folding Game or Stille Post. We also got inspired by the restriction of being home all day or by newly found pandemic features like the drawing function on Zoom. Working in that way was not only fun and entertaining but let us gain many new experiences. For instance giving up control because of not knowing and not being able to influence what the next person would do with your design. With five people involved time was scheduled differently and a sense of uncertainty was created. This sometimes felt extremely straining but at the same time it was joyous and rewarding to see the final result. It somehow felt like the mystery of developing analogue films in your childhood. We realized that the limitations and restrictions we imposed on ourselves seemed like a burden at the beginning but were actually so refreshing in the end. The results were much more interesting because we would stop using our oh so well-known tools and had to express ourselves by only drawing rectangles for example. Limiting the time frame also helped to not overthink and to just start creating – resulting in a more free and expressive way of designing something than usual. Even though the semester is over now and our project seems to be completed with handing-in this collaboratively created documentation, we all agree that we will probably continue doing some experimental sessions now and then in the future.

Göllgpie

Dara Elena Bubel, Hannah Kluge, Isabel Kiefaber, Ulrike Rausch, Yasemin Çakır

UdK SCHAU21 30. Oktober 2021 FREEWHEELING - SCHAU21 ist ein Trailer. Bachelor- und Masterabsolvent*innen 2019-2021 des Institutes für experimentelles Bekleidung- und Textildesign waren gefragt. Die Antworten verfilmt. Die Reflektionen zitiert. Die künstlerischen Arbeiten zu einer gemeinsamen Erzählung verknüpft und verwoben. MEINE PASSION BEFINDET SICH IN EINER SCHIZOPHRENEN LAGE. MEIN INTERESSE AN DER MODE VERÄNDERT SICH MIT MEINER UMGEBUNG UND MEINEN UMSTÄNDEN. WER SIND WIR, WANN SIND WIR UND WIE DRÜCKEN WIR UNS AUS? WAS SOLL ÜBERHAUPT NOCH PRODUZIERT WERDEN UND MIT WELCHER BEGRÜNDUNG? WIR BRAUCHEN NICHT NOCH MEHR SEELENLOSE OBJEKTE UND WIR BRAUCHEN AUCH KEINE TRENDS ZUM NACHEIFERN. VISIONEN SCHAFFEN. SICH KRITISCH ZUM BESTEHENDEN VERHALTEN. KONSTRUKTIV AUF ZUKÜNFTIGES WIRKEN. BEWEGT HAT MICH MEINE QUÄLENDE LANGEWEILE UND DER DRANG DANACH, MEINER FAULHEIT AUSDRUCK ZU VERLEIHEN. WER SAGT, DASS NICHTSTUN UNPRODUKTIV SEIN MUSS? MODE KANN, WENN SIE SICH NICHT NUR ALS PROFITORIENTIERTE INDUSTRIE BEGREIFT, MEDIUM SEIN. DENN MODE KANN DISKURSE ÜBER KÖRPER/IDENTITÄT/DINGE/INHALTE KREIEREN. WAS WIR BRAUCHEN? EINEN KRITISCHEN DISKURS DARÜBER, WIE WIR ZUSAMMENLEBEN, WIE WIR UNS AUSDRÜCKEN WOLLEN, WIE UNSERE BEZIEHUNG ZU UNSERER MATERIELLEN UMGEBUNG IST UND WAS UNS PRÄGT. WIR BRAUCHEN REFLEKTIONEN ÜBER WERTIGKEITEN. GEMEINSCHAFT, INTERESSE, EUPHORIE, VERZWEIFLUNG UND GEMEINSAME ÜBERWINDUNG VON VERZWEIFLUNG. ERFOLG WIE SCHEITERN WERTSCHÄTZEN. SCHEITERN BEDEUTET CHANCE. VERBRAUCHER*INNEN VERFÜGEN OFT NICHT ÜBER DAS NÖTIGE WISSEN, BEWUSST ZU KONSUMIEREN. KONSUMENT*INNEN SOLLTEN DIE MÖGLICHKEIT BEKOMMEN, ZU VERSTEHEN, WIE EIN NEUER GEDANKE ENTSTEHT. ICH WÜNSCHE MIR EINEN STÄNDIGEN AUSTAUSCH UND KOOPERATIVES ARBEITEN MIT ANDEREN KREATIVEN GERN AUCH ÜBER DEN TELLERRAND DER MODE HINAUS. MAL IN DIE (TEXTILE) HAUT VON JEMAND ANDEREM SCHLÜPFEN. ZUSAMMENARBEITEN, ZUSAMMENARBEITEN, ZUSAMMENARBEITEN. Der Trailer wird als Performatives Screening im Rahmen des UdK RUNDGANGS am 30.10.2021 im Konzertsaal der UdK, Hardenbergstrasse 33, 10623 Berlin gezeigt. Gemäß der aktuellen Corona - Verordnung findet die Veranstaltung unter der 3G-Regel statt. Zutritt zur Veranstaltung ist nur mit dem offiziellen Nachweis über eine vollständige Impfung (der vollständige Impfnachweis muss älter als 14 Tage sein), eine Genesung oder eine nicht länger als 24 Stunden zurückliegende negative Testung erlaubt. Eine Vorherige Anmeldung ist erforderlich. Mit Abschlussarbeiten von Katharina Achterkamp, Ronja Biggemann, Nina Birri, Johanna Braun, Alessandro Gentile, Jasmin Halama, Paula Keilholz, Manfred Elias Knorr, Louis Krüger, Lina Lau, Lisa Oberländer, Smed•Wagner, Katharina Spitz In Kooperation mit zeitgebilde Filmproduktion UG und der Gesangsklasse Prof. Deborah York der UdK

Schau21 FREEWHEELING

Berit Greinke

In our installation-based performance project, we explored the theme of the inner critical voice in an interdisciplinary way and consider it in the context of our queer identities. We see many of our own ways of acting and thinking, also 'habits' as a result of trying to adapt to heteronormative, patriarchal structures. These patterns of acting and thinking are repeated over and over again, so we are in a loop. We want to intervene and break this loop in order to enter a new loop that questions the critical voice and related structures and allows for an unadaptive and queer reality of life. We often experience self-criticism as soon as we do not behave according to the norms, that is, do not conform to society's expectations. The internalization of societal values, norms and social roles happens unconsciously and must therefore be consciously questioned. We use our bodies as well as our studio work to create these loops of habit during the performance - but also to break them again. In doing so, we try to escape the destructive pattern of action and thought and create a mental place where we accept our queer selves. Costume plays an important role in this, as clothing has a direct impact on how we are read and which social groups we are assigned to. Costume and body merge in the performance to create a sculpture that does not reproduce heteronormative phenotypes, but invites visitors to question their categorical habits of seeing. With our performance we want to invite the visitors to reflect. In a place that visually transports "Radical Softness" and allows us to experience our queer realities of life in relation to mental health. Will the loop be disrupted?

THE CUTEST CRITICISM - a loop

Elin Laut

In the context of designed uncertainty we explored the movement and presence of a person within a room. Distinct movement shapes your presence. As we move individually and depending on the context, our mood etc. presence is not repeatable and uncertain. The room is constantly altered by different presences. To amplify the presence we translated the physical movement and distinctive non-movement with sound in a restricted area. The sonification of the body movement defines the room and highlights the limits of the defined space. Every person explores the room differently - there is an area of relation between generated sound feedback and body perception. The use of a sound generating setup and sound trigger zones results in complex relations in the control processes. The room can turn into an instrument where you can guide your sonification of movement and actively control the musical outcome. The setup is a room with a xbox kinect which tracks your body movement in a certain restricted area. Although the room it self is bigger only in the "eyesight of the kinect" the movement will become audible. Certain body parts and movements are triggering different sounds as well as multiple areas are activated by entering with your body. Spatial relations of body parts alter the expressions of the sound through parameters. There is a direct sound feedback while moving through the space. To document the project we choose to work with a performer who explored the room possibilities and created her own sound presence.

sound space

Zoe Spehr

Half a million. That’s roughly the number of meals ordered and delivered in the Berlin area every single week. Considering current developments - ever-increasing demand and the emergence of ghost kitchens; which are warehouse-like facilities preparing meals only for delivery in a more and more automated manner, one can safely project these numbers towards multiple million orders a week in the very near future. Inevitably, this will foster three mayor challenges: First, a logistical. To deliver millions of meals a week, a thought-through and future-proof distribution network needs to be in place. Second, an environmental. The single-use items used for packaging right now are creating a footprint that is neither ecologically nor economically sustainable. And third, a question of culinary delight. With preparation outsourced and a transformation of our eating habits to be expected, the lackluster packaging solutions offered today prevent many from truly enjoying what they ordered. The solution I came up with, is a reusable and recyclable bowl targeted at being implemented by delivery services themselves in a greater geographical area. When an order is placed, restaurants will fill a fresh bowl with the desired meal. Optional edible spacers allow for separation, while customers can decide whether cutlery needs to be provided. A tag identifies individual orders and enables future automation, and a semi-transparent lid creates a tight seal throughout delivery. Receiving their order, customers find everything they need included. The bowls ergonomic and aesthetically interesting shape caters to different settings and transforms from mere packaging to a presentation of culinary delight. When finished, a quick rinse is welcome yet not required, as the used bowls will be picked up the next day or next order for cleaning and redistribution by the initial delivery service. At the end of its life, a controlled withdrawal from circulation and conveyance towards recycling is thereby possible. Taking a glimpse into the future, it seems probable that food and its preparation may fully cross the line to becoming a large-scale service. While embracing change and its potential, let’s shape that change in a way where we may enjoy it for generations to come and preserve the culinary and social heritage built up over past millennia.

Lillipod I Janik Dietz

Design & Social Context, Prof. Ineke Hans, Maciej Chmara

Der Tourismus hat es sich zur Aufgabe gemacht, Landschaften und Kulturen weltweit in ein Objekt von Freizeitkonsum zu verwandeln. Dinge, die auf Reisen gekauft werden, sind - neben dem Fotografieren – das wichtigste Mittel, das Dort-gewesen-sein festzuhalten; den flüchtigen Eindruck einer Reise Dauerhaftigkeit zu verleihen. Das Souvenir, die objekthafte und oberflächliche Erinnerung an einen fremden Ort (frz. se souvenir = sich erinnern), kann als Beispiel vor Augen führen, wie sich der moderne, globalisierte Mensch von heute „seine“ Umwelt aneignet und (Urlaubs-) Landschaften verbraucht. Die raumgreifende Installation aus Stahl zeigt sich im Deckmantel eines Souvenirshops, dessen Exponate/ Souvenirs mit einer Augenzwinkernden Träne auf den Ausverkauf der Erde anspielen. In pool-blau steht der Souvenirshop stellvertretend als künstliche Kulisse einer sommerlichen Urlaubslandschaft. Teil davon ist auch eine unbequeme Strandliege mit Sonnenschirm (Tourists only), von der aus man den unendlichen Sonnenuntergang auf einem Servierwagen serviert bekommt. (en. infinitiy sunset = das unendliche Ende). Dabei steht nicht nur das Ladenschild um 2 Grad (Pariser Klimaabkommen) schief. Es werden Souvenirs gezeigt, die sich am Gewöhnlichen bedienen: Herkömmliche Plastikverpackungen fragen mit 3D gedruckte Muscheln nach natürlicher Authentizität, durchgelegene Strandliegen zeigen Spuren der Verwüstung und die Glasgefäße sind für den „Sand von deinem Lieblings-Strand“ oder eher für das „Wasser aus deinem Lieblings-Pool“ gedacht. Selbstverständlich im sprachlichen Gewand deines Lieblingslandes, nur eben so, dass auch jede*r es verstehst. „Wenn die sommerliche Leichtigkeit des globalen Fortschritts zu Ende geht“ Anna Loewenhaupt Tsing

Ein Kommentar zum Ende des Erhabenen

Moritz Korbinian Kreul

The project is based on the perspective of viewing the urban as a constructed ecosystem. Taking this perspective, every form of life that contributes to the preservation of a livable and biodiverse environment comes to the fore and is taken into account in the process of imagining, developing and realizing a just and ecological society. A new form of continuous spatial production, energy supply, food production, residing, working and living, research and renaturation will be proposed for a formerly industrially used site in Berlin Rummelsburg with the aim of initiating the development of a social and ecological life practice. According to the vegetation, different areas are defined, which describe the future relationship between man and nature and an appropriate treatment of soil and vegetation. Areas of renaturation where man takes deliberate targeted measures to support nature in the process of wildness, areas of cultivated nature, research beds that analyze and evaluate the cultivation of plants under different conditions, and areas where contaminated soils are detoxified and renaturated through remediation measures. Existing tanks, originally used as water reservoirs, are being converted into the site's energy center. Through solar cells, biogas plants operated in cooperation with the municipal waste disposal, a combined heat and power plant and water tanks, a decentralized energy supply model is proposed that will make the surrounding area mostly independent of large energy suppliers. The Bioshelter, a residential building for about 200 people, proposes a productive, climate-active form of housing in which human and natural habitats overlap. The algae farm interconnects production cycles of aquaponics, algae production, and a server farm in a way that allows for resource-efficient year-round production. The Movement House transforms an existing industrial building into an infrastructure that stimulates and enables formal and informal movement among residents. The research station collects data on the state of the ecosystem, analyzes, evaluates, experiments, tries and maintains. The residents of the area become gardeners of their shared livelihood - people are involved in multiple ways in the processes that contribute to the preservation of the constructed ecosystem.

CONSTRUCTED ECOSYSTEMS

Barbara Herschel

Das Briefing für den digitalen UdK-Laden war die Basis für ein Projekt, das die Kommunikation der UdK komplett anders denkt. Statt einer Nabelschau, haben die Studierenden schnell das Potenzial erkannt, das sich rund um den neuen UdK:shop für ihre Bedürfnisse ergibt. Herausgekommen ist eine Plattform, das UdK:hub, das sich an den Interessen und am künstlerischen Content, Orientiert und gleichzeitig eine Kommunikationsbasis »Von Studierenden für Studierende« darstellt. Ähnlich einer Mediathek werden hier unter der Marke UdK:hub die Angebote wie der UdK:shop, der UdK:stream, die UdK:gallery, der UdK:pop-up, der UdK:place zusammengefasst. Gleichzeitig können sich die Studierenden unkompliziert interdisziplinär vernetzen, austauschen und gemeinsam Projekte entwickeln. Erzeugt werden »Sichtbarkeit« und »Mitnehmbarkeit« nach Innen und Außen unter einer Adresse und einer klaren Navigationsstruktur. Studierende aus VK, GWK und PD haben hierfür eine komplettes CI, CD sowohl für die Dachmarke als auch die Untermarken konzipiert und realisiert, mit allem was dazu gehört. Hier können Sie sich durch die finale Präsentation klicken, die nicht nur die Marketingabteilung der UdK, sondern auch den Präsidenten überzeugt hat. Studierende: Adel Alameddine (VK), Josephine Aymar (VK), Anna Beilmann (VK), Neïl Benhidjeb (PD), Jasmin Bina Khahi (VK), Nil Cakmak (VK), Franz Deckert (DK), Jonas Gerber (VK), Eva Gerngroß (DK), Dominic Gollanek (VK), Angel Hafermaas (VK), Charlene Kilthau (GWK), Ferdinand Kirsch (VK), Julia Kressirer (VK), Thomas Kuhn (VK), Ha My Le Thi (VK), Guy Levi (VK), Niclas Moos (VK), Nadine Mourad (GWK), Quan Minh Ha (VK), Annemarijn Mulder (VK), Josefine Nitzsche (VK), Katica Pejic (VK), Martha Plättner (VK), Alex Röschel (GWK), Eymen Sahin (VK), Lina Sastimdur (GWK), Elisabeth Schachoff (VK), Manou Schatton (VK), Tess Schwaiger (PD), Robyn Steffen (VK), Maija Suipe (VK), Svea Theiler (GWK), Nora Veismann (VK), Shilong Xu (VK), Isa Zappe (VK) DozentInnen: Prof. Uwe Vock, Gosia Warrink, Claudia Malecka (Tutorin) Gast-DozentInnen: Sonja Knecht, Gesine Last, Attila Hartwig, Sebastian Herold

UdK:hub // UdK:shop

Claudia Malecka

Taking the shore of an island as a boundary, it represents a conflict zone, an uncertain boundary, both geographically and psychologically. Being separated by the water shapes a limit and a definition. However, the space can be utilized and function as an active and connecting space. Two border-drawing-robot arms are placed on two different islands: Valentinswerder and Taiwan. The drawn line gets washed away by the water in a never-ending play. Both portray an individual story of the island and its connection to the mainland. Valentinswerder is a remote island that has a strong connection to Berlin due to its size and distance. Using the space as a connecting element. Despite forming an own system and home to the islanders the connection with the mainland is indispensable. Taiwan is separated from the mainland of China by the Taiwan strait, the shortest distance is only about 130 kilometers. For some people, the strait is a natural barrier that protects their independence. For others, it is just a gap, which cuts them off from the past. The relationship between Taiwan and China is still changing. As islanders, we can only constantly redefine our identity in the floating spectrum, like drawing lines in front of where we stand. To draw lines on the ground is a strong statement, sometimes it even looks like a rejection. The lines are our boundary, our defense, and our definition. In the intertidal zone, lines are wiped away by waves. Even though we all know this will happen, we still keep drawing.

Drawing Borders

Zoe Spehr

»Neobiota« are species (animals, plants, fungi) that have settled in an area outside their original biotope. These processes are always associated with complex interactions: This means that not only the neobiont has to adapt to its new environment, but also the biotope changes when a new species establishes itself. In ten interventions with different media, the UdK design students investigate whether neobiont migration processes and interactions can also be demonstrated for artefacts. What happens to objects when they leave their biotope and end up in completely different contexts? How will the objects behave in these unfamiliar environments - and how do these environments behave towards them? Will their original functions remain in the foreground in the other contexts or will they be interpreted in a completely new way? Can they unfold undreamed-of values or do they lose relevance altogether? Such transformations are not normally envisaged in museum contexts. On the contrary: the museum‘s task is precisely to protect the objects from any changes. They are taken out of the living world of becoming and passing away and surrounded by a semi-permeable protective cloak: looking in is possible, looking out is hardly possible. Yet most of them have a centuries-long, often very eventful biography of value creation and change, but also of destruction behind them - including the raids, and wars, that were waged around them or about them. What happens when we abduct the immobilised objects and bring them back to life? When we transplant them into unfamiliar social contexts, invent new narratives and put them to the test? What stories can be developed going forward - and what stories can be told when those so mad return to the museum biotope? What multiple dialogues and also contagions occur in the collection spaces of the Museum of Decorative Arts between the originals and the neo-biontic returnees?

Neobionten

Anja Lapatsch

Conceived and designed by Giovanni Betti (Assistant Professor, UC Berkeley) and Arch. Katharina Fleck, the installation narrates the story of the Presena Glacier in the Italian Alps and the communities that live with it. Climate change has already risen average yearly temperatures in the Alps by twice as much the global average. To save this glacier from the rising temperatures the nearby community started covering ports of it in 2008 to protect the snow from solar radiation in the summer. Their efforts paid off and the area that needed protection kept on growing. Today more than 100,000 sqm of glacier are covered every summer in a special geotextile to prevent melting. Aiming at raising awareness of the increasingly complex relationship with the natural environment the design and fabrication of the installation was supported by the students of the elective course in structural analysis offered by Prof. Christoph Gengnagel. The resulting aerial structure is a special type of cable-membrane structure that required careful planning to allow the textile to be draped in the shape of the glacier it aims to protect. Students learned about digital physics simulation, digital fabrication and hands-on production of the installation. After a first installation in the atrium of the UdK in March, a select group of tutors and students have travelled to Venice for the final installation in the Italian Pavilion at the Arsenale as part of the Architecture Biennale 2021. https://theinvisiblemountain.com

Invisible Mountain

Felix Benjamin Deiters, Saqib Hashim Aziz, Konstruktives Entwerfen und Tragwerksplanung

This project arises from the eviction of an antique store called KUNST UND CHAOS. The experience of its gradual disappearance, along with some other stores in the area, triggered questions and reflections about space-time, emptiness, uncertainty and distance. In times of confinement and pandemic, space-time notions have been the object of discussion and have fought not only in their physical interpretations, but also in their emotional dimensions. This sensitive character has opened the way to new ways of relating to dichotomies such as inside-outside, day-night or light-darkness. And it is due to these recurring concerns that have appeared rethinking about time and its configuration thanks to the perception of movement, a movement that thanks to its restriction has taken on other nuances. The current state of the project is presented as a three-channel video installation. The images of the installation show an experimental montage of the performative reading action that I carried out in front of the antique store. My voice is transmitted by means of a laser device that sends audible waves through the empty warehouse and is amplified on the other side of the showcases by means of another device that receives light waves. This action was carried out as a poetic gesture of reflection on space and the paradox of a confinement that brought with it the increase of emptiness. The performance is a reading of notes made during the time of confinement and the devices used are a project of transmission and reception of sound waves by means of laser light (light amplified by emission of stimulated radiation) that I have been developing as part of my research project on affective specialties and temporalities in my program of arts and media studies at the UdK.

Friction that doesn't stop

Juan Pablo Gaviria Bedoya

These spirals represent the trajectory of the artist's life and your life. All of these drawings were created during the pandemic of Covid-19 and related to the lockdown in Berlin. The emotional, spiritual and mental well-being can be on a positive trajectory to be nurturing and enabling. It is all about movement, recommencement, and guidance. The current situation can also be a catalyst for reaching your goals and developing a constructive style of correspondence. Through his work, Marcel Schwittlick wants to offer a talisman to remember where your life is. The Upward Spiral series comprises 144 editions, which the artist draws with a custom built drawing machine. Each drawing takes about 9h to produce. The Upward Spiral series has a very personal meaning. It represents a reminder of the trajectory of our lives. To be mindful about whether one is in an upward and also downward trajectory, these spirals are perfectly symmetrical. For me, this type of spiral symbolizes an awareness of dynamics in life that helps avoid stress and pain. It plays with the idea of improving yourself, working on discipline and creativity. Usually, we find ourselves struggling to get our lives together, and sometimes we are succeeding at our plans to become a better person every day. There is no linear way for people to reach their goals in life. The actual human experience is much different. Being unable to control ourselves and our surroundings, we break down, and later, with the help of new discoveries, we can get back up and develop further. This is a constant flux between order and chaos; both are necessary in our lives. I think it's important to be aware of that. This is along the lines of what an Upward Spiral may represent.

Upward Spiral 🟡🔵

Marcel Schwittlick